Review⎜Beauty and the Boss (Modern Fairytale #1) by Diane Alberts

Posted June 6, 2016 / 2016, Reviews
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Review⎜Beauty and the Boss (Modern Fairytale #1) by Diane AlbertsBeauty and the Boss by Diane Alberts
Series: Modern Fairytales #1
Published by Entangled Publishing on November 13th 2015
Genres: Adult, Contemporary Romance, Retelling
Pages: 214
Format: e-book
Source: Purchased
Goodreads
three-stars

Beauty is about to tame her beast...

Researcher Maggie Donovan has no luck with men, and it doesn't help that she can't keep her eyes off of her sexy boss - the one everyone else in the office calls The Beast. Relationships in the office are forbidden. So no one is more surprised than Maggie when she pretends to be his fiancée to save him during a difficult situation. Not only has she put her job on the line, but the future of the company.

Billionaire Benjamin Gale III doesn't believe in love or romance, but the look on his mother's face when Maggie tells her that she's his fiancée is worth millions. Instead of firing her for her insubordination, he goes along with the ruse. In his arms-and in his bed-she'd be everything he could ever want…which is why he can't have her.

But if he doesn't let her go, they'll lose everything…

This book may be unsuitable for people under 18 years of age due to its use of sexual content, drug and alcohol use, and/or violence.


If you’ve been following my reviews, I think it’s pretty obvious I have a soft spot for the marriage of convenience/ fake engagement trope. Add that whole modern Beauty and the Beast, and I just had to read Beauty and the Boss. 

Researcher Maggie Donovan is one of the most hardworking employees in Gale Enterprises; a proof is her propensity to work overtime alongside the big boss, Benjamin “The Beast” Gale III. Unbeknownst to Maggie, Benjamin is very much aware of her hard work and dedication to the company, and he’s grateful for it. So, when a business partner cancels dinner plans with Benjamin, he invites Maggie to eat dinner with him in his office. Nothing weird with that, of course; it was harmless dinner, nothing more. They weren’t breaking the “No Office Relationship” company policy. Unfortunately for them, when Helen, Benjamin’s horror of a mother, finds them in a seemingly compromising position, she assumes the worst and threatens to fire both Benjamin and Maggie.

In a state of panic, Maggie does the only thing she thinks would save both her and her boss’s ass—pretend to be his longtime girlfriend and fiancee. As long as they’ve been together before Maggie joined the company and the relationship is serious, they’re safe. When the evil mother Helen leaves in a huff, Maggie realizes she might have done the absolute worst thing she could possibly do. Thankfully, instead of firing her like any normal angered CEO would, Benjamin plays along with the engagement farce. Of course, if they wanted to convince everyone that they were truly in love with each other, they’re going to have to practice. And practice, they did.

I fairly enjoyed reading this book. Maggie had more backbone than what people expected, Benjamin wasn’t really a beast, Helen the evil mother was, and I had no idea where Benjamin’s brother’s loyalties truly lay until somewhere near the end. The chemistry between Maggie and Benjamin was thick and palpable, and it was really sweet what Maggie did on their second “date”. 

Benjamin is your typical alpha male—domineering, possessive, powerful. But like Beast in Beauty and the Beast, he has a softer side. He’s kind, caring, and will protect and love the people most important to him. He holds onto something heavy on his own, and he’s been trying to repent for the last six years over something that wasn’t truly his fault.  

I think in this book, Benji’s the one who showed the most character growth. In their first “date”, he brings Maggie on his typical first date plan—expensive restaurant, fancy food, red roses. He didn’t care to know what Maggie’s preferences would be, thus ending the date in a near-death experience to Maggie, thanks to an allergic reaction to shellfish. Maggie teaches him to be a better person, at least in the dating department.  

Somewhere in the second half, the drama was too much for me. I would have rated it higher if not for that, but overall, I had fun reading this book. I look forward to reading Diane Alberts’ second book in her Modern Fairytale series.

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three-stars


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